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  • Dress by Helmut Lang

    role as the marketing director and human face among the tech algorithms – even advising on what shade of blue the ubiquitous logo should be.

    Now, she has written an engaging memoir, Dot Complicated, about the early days of Facebook. It includes the heart-stopping moment when, in 2007, the siblings negotiated Randi’s starting package in the fledgling business. Mark passed her a napkin on which he had scrawled a salary and stock options; Randi looked at it, crossed out the stock options, and asked for a bigger salary. Mark encouraged her to take the original offer. She held out. Graciously, she now says, “My brother was looking out for me, though I was too young and naïve to notice at the time.” That napkin must have wiped billions off her personal fortune. “That was a good learning moment,” she says. “Before that, I didn’t know equity was something you could ask for in a company. I included that in the book to urge more women to negotiate themselves a better deal.

    “WOMEN often come to a business with the same SKILLSET as men, but fall behind because they don’t NEGOTIATE”


    Women often come to a business with the same skillset as men but they fall behind because they don’t negotiate as well. Asking for equity says: I believe in this company.”


    With old colleague Sheryl Sandberg – Facebook COO and author of Lean In – as a mentor figure, it is no surprise that Zuckerberg wants to address some of the anxieties that stop women from reaching the top. She credits Sandberg and Yahoo! chief Marissa Meyer with bringing a sense of style to Silicon Valley. “It used to be that you could only wear jeans and tees [or] you’d frighten the engineers. But Marissa Meyer is not afraid to have a little glamor. You should be able to own your success and your femininity.”

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